Build Up:

20 Miles Per Week

Great Strides 2007

Shelly Florence-Glover
 

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The Basics:

WARM UP/COOL DOWN

Warm ups increase muscle blood flow and flexibility, focuses your mind and powers-up muscles for your runs. Start with a few minutes of relaxation and limbering or 5 to 10 minutes walking or slow jogging to increases blood flow before accelerating to training pace. Some harried runners skip the pre-run routine forcing the body gear-up on the run, which is entirely possible, but not very pleasant.

After a run, cool down bywalking for 5 –10 minutes to slow your heart rate then stretch thoroughly. Cooling down is quite pleasant, some runners skip this part too, which is entirely possible.

PACE

Most running is at conversational pace. Take the talk test frequently. Run slow enough for conversation, yet fast enough for perspiration. If you can talk in full sentences or hum a tune your pace is just fine. Carry on. You are improving your aerobic endurance. If you can't chat, slow down until you are more comfortable. Having fun runs goes a long way to keeping you committed to your training.

MILEAGE

At the modest end, maintaining fitness required 30 minutes of running 3-5 times per week or about 8 to 12 miles. This gives you all the health benefits of exercise and enough endurance to participate in short races for fun and challenge. Minimally, run 10-15 miles per week to complete a 5k; 15-20 for 10K; and 20-30 for a half marathon; and 30-45 for a casual marathon.

 

Your Plan

STRETCHING & STRENGTHING

For a balanced fitness program address your flexibility and non-running strength too. Maintaining flexibility, minimizes injury and improves performance with stretching 3-7 days per week. Maintain or improve strength using simple weights, crunches and push-ups 2-3 days per week.

INJURY

All athletes in all sports experience injuries – the key is to keep minor injuries from becoming major ones by using common sense. Don't run in pain. Don't run if you are favoring an injury. Get advice from a medical sports expert familiar with runner's aches and pains.

STAY WITH IT

You may be motivated to run for any of the usual reasons: to lose weight, look better, feel better or improve your health.
Many people drop out on the way to getting fast and fit, or get in shape only to give up. Be patient. It's going to take a while to get into good shape. Lasting results mean a lasting commitment. Be persistent. Be consistent.

A LITTLE MORE

Running Coach Shelly Glover is has a master's degree in exercise physiology from Columbia University. She co-authored The Runner's Handbook and The Competitive Runner’s Handbook is a veteran road runner and marathoner. She also coaches The Greater New York Racing Team is available for private coaching. Coaching Services

 

These are sample schedules: Saturdays and Sundays are interchangeable mileage days and can be switched to accommodate long runs, resting and races.

 

20-Mile Build Up Sample Schedule

Week

M

T

W

R

F

S

S

Total Mileage

1

0

3

0

0

0

3

3

9

2

0

3

0

0

4

3

10

3

0

3

0

3

0

3

3

12

4

0

3

0

3

0

4

3

13

5

3

3

0

3

0

3

3

15

6

0

4

0

4

0

5

3

16

7

3

4

0

3

0

4

4

18

8

3

4

0

3

0

6

3

19

9

0

4

0

5

0

5

4

18

10

3

4

0

4

0

6

3

20